Rose Couture

Aspiring teacher. “The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires.” ― William Arthur Ward

Class Curriculum, My Curriculum, And Learning Through Crisis

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At the beginning of my ECS 210 course, we were asked the following question: What is curriculum? As a classroom, everybody raised their hands in turn to give a characteristic of their own definition of curriculum, what curriculum meant to them. The prof in front of the lecture theatre wrote these on the blackboard and came up with a group definition/representation of curriculum.
Curriculum includes multiple documents from the ministry of education that are mandated. These documents form the fundamental basis for teaching and provide a framework or guideline for what should be taught including outcomes and indicators for learning. Curriculum is provided/shaped by the environment – context and culture matter. While curriculum does change, and can be adapted it also facilitates continuity across education systems. In curriculum, time matters; material must be able to be taught/tested within a timeframe. Curriculum includes what we choose to teach and what we don’t teach. Curriculum can be directed more broadly to being inclusive and directed to different types of learners and can be thought as contributing to success in life and the development of a well-rounded individual.
This week, we were asked to rewrite this definition on our own, so that it reflects our own sense of the idea of curriculum.
Here is mine:
A curriculum is a set of documents containing outcomes and indicators that were previously agreed upon by educators, directors and the Ministry of Education, before finding its way into the classroom, where the teacher will have to follow the “mandated outcomes”, within a time frame in order to test the students’ knowledge. These documents are seen as the fundamental basis for teaching and follow the teaching norms, previously established by government, ministries, educators and directors. A teacher has the choice to follow learning indicators that will help reach the numerous outcomes, or to come up with their own methods to achieve the same objective. While curriculum has been implemented to assure continuity across education systems, curriculum is different in every single classroom, in every single school, in every province across the country. It is believed that if educators follow all these outcomes and fundamental rules, they will produce a well-rounded individual, a student filled with knowledge. Curriculum is formal and hidden, as what we teach and what we choose not to teach, sends different messages in our classroom community. We also have the possibility to adapt the curriculum so that we are inclusive of the variety of students present in our classroom.
SK Curriculum for Social Studies Grade 9

SK Curriculum for Social Studies Grade 9

In this definition, I will have to admit that there is no room for ‘crisis’ and ‘learning through crisis’, which is not a good thing. It seems to me that many people see education as a ‘production’ process. We have students in our classrooms, we want them to learn and to pass standardized tests, and go on to the next level, they graduate, and we feel accomplished. Schools should not be seen as factories. As we know, schools are much more than factories, they are where students will feel inspired, where students will want to learn, where they will be challenged, and given the right support and resources to surpass those challenges. Curriculums are pre-determined, they are constructed in a way where an instructor will have to follow a tight timeframe, not allowing any room for crisis. As every single minute of our lives are different, every single minute in a classroom should also be different from one time to another. If you are teaching something and a student raises a good question that sparks interest in his colleagues, will you just pass on that opportunity because you are on a “tight” schedule? Many problems, ideas, and events that would benefit student learning may occur in our classrooms, but we have not necessarily planned time for these and might feel obligated to continue on with the objectives that were pre-determined by authority. I am not saying that curriculum is bad overall, I am just trying to show how so many events that could benefit our students in their identity and knowledge construction are often put aside to follow the rules, the “more important things”. Maybe curriculum should be examined even more in-depth, what are these fundamentals and curriculums saying about the individuals who created them, about the individuals we are, and the ones we want to help shape? What are your thoughts on crisis and curriculum in general? And education, is it really a production process?
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One thought on “Class Curriculum, My Curriculum, And Learning Through Crisis

  1. Pingback: Class Curriculum, My Curriculum, And Learning T...

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